Thomas DeFrantz

Thomas DeFrantz

Professor of Women's Studies

External address: 
1316 Campus Dr, Rm 243C, Durham, NC 27708
Internal office address: 
African and African-American S, Box 90252, Durham, NC 27708
Phone: 
(919) 668-1929

Education & Training

  • Ph.D., New York University 1997

DeFrantz, Thomas F., and Anita Gonzalez, editors. Black Performance Theory. Duke University Press, 2014.

DeFrantz, T. F. Dancing Revelations: Alvin Ailey's Embodiment of African American Culture. 2011, pp. 1–320. Scopus, doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195301717.001.0001. Full Text

Defrantz, Thomas F., editor. Dancing Many Drums. Univ of Wisconsin Press, 2002.

DeFrantz, T. F., and P. Badejo. Forewords. 2018, pp. vii–xii. Scopus, doi:10.1007/978-3-319-70314-5. Full Text

DeFrantz, T. F. “Them: Recombinant aesthetics of restaging experimental performance.” The Sentient Archive: Bodies, Performance, and Memory, 2018, pp. 268–92.

DeFrantz, T. “Hip Hop in Hollywood: Encounter, Community, Resistance.” The Oxford Handbook of Dance and the Popular Screen, edited by Melissa Blanco Borelli, Oxford University Press, 2014.

DeFrantz, T. “Hip Hop Habitus v.2.0.” Black Performance Theory: An Anthology of Critical Readings, edited by Thomas F. DeFrantz and Anita Gonzalez, Duke University Press, 2014, pp. 223–42.

DeFrantz, T. “Unchecked Popularity: Neoliberal Circulations of Black Social Dance.” Neoliberalism and Global Theatres: Performance Permutations, edited by L. Nielson and P. Ybarra, Palgrave Macmillan, 2012, pp. 128–40.

DeFrantz, T. “Unchecked Popularity: Neoliberal Circulations of Black Social Dance.” Neoliberalism and Global Theatres, edited by Lara D. Nielsen and Patricia Ybarra, Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.

DeFrantz, T. “'Popular Dances of the 1920s and early 30s: From Animal Dance Crazes to the Lindy Hop' and 'Popular African American Dance of the 1950s and 60s.'.” Ain’t Nothing LIke the Real Thing, edited by Richard Carlin and Kinshasha Conwill, Smithsonian Inst Press (Natl Museum of African American History and Culture), 2010, pp. 66–70.

DeFrantz, T. “Donald Byrd: Re/Making 'Beauty'.” Dance Discourses, edited by Susanne Franco and Centre national de la danse France, Routledge, 2007, pp. 221–35.

DeFrantz, T. “Hip Hop Sexualities.” Handbook of the New Sexuality Studies, edited by Steven Seidman et al., Routledge, 2007.

DeFrantz, T. On the Presence of the Body: Essays on Dance and Performance Theory. Edited by A. Lepecki, Wesleyan University Press, 2004, pp. 64–81.

Pages

Defrantz, T. F. “White privilege.” Theater, vol. 48, no. 3, Nov. 2018, pp. 23–37. Scopus, doi:10.1215/01610775-7084669. Full Text

DeFrantz, T. F. “Identifying the endgame.” Theater, vol. 47, no. 1, Jan. 2017, pp. 3–15. Scopus, doi:10.1215/01610775-3710429. Full Text

DeFrantz, T. F. “I Am Black: (You have to be willing to not know).” Theater, vol. 47, no. 2, Jan. 2017, pp. 9–21. Scopus, doi:10.1215/01610775-3785122. Full Text

DeFrantz, T. F., and T. A. Willis. “Introduction: Black moves: New research in black dance studies.” Black Scholar, vol. 46, no. 1, Jan. 2016, pp. 1–3. Scopus, doi:10.1080/00064246.2016.1119632. Full Text

DeFrantz, T. “Theorizing Connectivity: African American Women in Concert Dance.” Journal of Pan African Studies, vol. 4, Sept. 2011, pp. 56–74.

DeFrantz, T. F. “Performing the breaks: Notes on African American Aesthetic structures.” Theater, vol. 40, no. 1, Apr. 2010, pp. 31–37. Scopus, doi:10.1215/01610775-2009-017. Full Text

DeFrantz, T. F. “Movement in the age of globalization: A Panel.” Theater, vol. 40, no. 1, Apr. 2010, pp. 39–45. Scopus, doi:10.1215/01610775-2009-019. Full Text

DeFrantz, T. E. “Composite Bodies of dance: The repertory of the Alvin Ailey American dance theater.” Theatre Journal, vol. 57, no. 4, Dec. 2005, pp. 659–78. Scopus, doi:10.1353/tj.2006.0012. Full Text

DeFrantz, T. “Believe the Hype! Hype Williams and Afro-Futurist Filmmaking.” Refractory: A Journal of Entertainment Media, vol. 4, 2003.

Defrantz, T. F. “IV. Blacking Queer Dance.” Dance Research Journal, vol. 34, no. 2, Jan. 2002, pp. 102–05. Scopus, doi:10.2307/1478465. Full Text

Pages

Defrantz, T. F. “Bone-breaking, black social dance, and queer corporeal orature.” Black Scholar, vol. 46, no. 1, 2016, pp. 66–74. Scopus, doi:10.1080/00064246.2015.1119624. Full Text

i don't trust you anymore. Choreographer, Dancer. (2017)

Abstract

Solo dance for spring dance concert ChoreoLab 2017.

ZwischenRaum. Dramaturg. (2012)

Abstract

Dresden Ballet, Dresden, Germany. Original 25 minute ballet.

Why Are We First?. Choreographer. (2012)

Abstract

Structured improvisation duet made with Amanda Miller and a third performer, Jung-Eun Kim. Explored practice of creating work. 8-Minute piece included video and camera interface and live internet radio accompaniment, and improvised text.

Performing Black. Choreographer. (2012)

Abstract

This thirty-minute duet work explored Africanist aesthetics and challenges of viewing and responding to work made by black artists in the context of a downtown, live art New York tradition. The work was reviewed by the New York Times.

Theory-Ography 4: we queer here. Choreographer. (2012)

Abstract

This iteration of an ongoing research and performance project explored concepts of queer theory in relation to dance improvisation. The twenty-minute work was performed by seven dancers, including myself, as a keynote presentation for the CORD conference

you should've told me. Creator, Dancer. (2016)

Abstract

Created and performed with Duke dancers Cindy Li and Dasha Chapman. Digital media interface by Libi Striegl.

Based on Images. Director, Dramaturg. (2012)

Abstract

SLIPPAGE provided direction and conceptual Design for Based on Images created by Wideman-Davis Dance Company; included visual design and soundscore design. Forty-Five minute contemporary dance performance, run from November 27 to December 1, 2012.

ZwischenRaum. Dramaturg. (2012)

Abstract

Dresden Ballet, Dresden, Germany. Original 25 minute ballet.

Why Are We First?. Choreographer. (2012)

Abstract

Structured improvisation duet made with Amanda Miller and a third performer, Jung-Eun Kim. Explored practice of creating work. 8-Minute piece included video and camera interface and live internet radio accompaniment, and improvised text.

Performing Black. Choreographer. (2012)

Abstract

This thirty-minute duet work explored Africanist aesthetics and challenges of viewing and responding to work made by black artists in the context of a downtown, live art New York tradition. The work was reviewed by the New York Times.

Theory-Ography 4: we queer here. Choreographer. (2012)

Abstract

This iteration of an ongoing research and performance project explored concepts of queer theory in relation to dance improvisation. The twenty-minute work was performed by seven dancers, including myself, as a keynote presentation for the CORD conference

Dance: American Art, 1830–1960. Consultant, Performing artist. Dance and the Museum: Professor on New Hit Exhibit (2016)

Abstract

Contributed a video installation of tap traditions and African-American dance forms for the exhibit "Dance: American Art, 1830–1960" on display at the Detroit Institute of Arts, March-June 2016.

where did i think i was going? [moving into signal]. Creator, Performing artist. (2014)

Abstract

"where did i think i was going? [moving into signal]" engages five separate interface designs gathered to underscore the vagaries of contemporary life reflected through prisms of digital scale. Digital cameras, Kinect cameras, and wireless microphones will record gestures by the performers and process the images and sounds through MAX, Isadora, and Ableton Live software. The work wonders at the physical and emotional cost of incessant movement resulting from job changes, natural disasters, and shifts in available technology.

are you still busy being mad at me?. Choreographer, Designer. (2013)

Abstract

Theatrical/dance performance using technology created by Cameron Britt, the EMVIBE, an acoustic vibraphone, with collaboration by Duke student dancers.